chinese fringe flower outside the swann building
Kristen Bailey

With the first day of spring just around the corner, campus is beginning to look different. Recent rain has helped the many plants on campus begin to bloom, and new color is emerging around every corner. Take a look at some of what's blooming on campus, with plant identities brought to you by Georgia Tech's Landscape Services team.

primrose jasmine along north avenue
The yellow flowers of primrose jasmine (jasminum mesnyi) bloom along North Avenue. Photo by Kristen Bailey.

 

chinese fringe flower along the swann building
Chinese Fringe Flower (loropetalum chinense) blooms along the Swann Building on Cherry Street. Photo by Kristen Bailey.

 

oakleaf hydrangea
An oakleaf hydrangea (hydrangea quercifolia) near Tech Tower shows its first signs of spring growth. Photo by Kristen Bailey.

 

saucer magnolia
Pink saucer magnolias (magnolia × soulangeana) bloom near the Bill Moore Student Success Center. Photo by Samantha Rose-Sinclair.

 

saucer magnolia
A close-up of pink saucer magnolias (magnolia × soulangeana). Photo by Brice Zimmerman.

 

pink indian azalea
A pink Indian azalea (rhododendron indicum 'formosa') blooms near the Bill Moore Student Success Center. Photo by Brice Zimmerman.

 

callery pear
A callery pear (pyrus calleryana) tree blooms near Brittain Dining Hall. Photo by Brice Zimmerman.

 

Shasta daisies have emerged near Tech Tower.
Shasta daisies (leucanthemum × superbum) have emerged near Tech Tower. Photo by Brice Zimmerman.

 

buds on a swamp azalea
Buds of a swamp azalea (rhododendron viscosum) begin to sprout near Harrison Square. Photo by Brice Zimmerman.

 

swamp azalea bud
A budding swamp azalea (rhododendron viscosum) after a recent rainstorm. Photo by Brice Zimmerman.

 

Moss phlox (phlox subulata) blooms in light purples hues
Moss phlox (phlox subulata) blooms in light purple hues along Ferst Drive. Photo by Allison Carter.

 

Golden ragwort (packera aurea) in the Ecocommons
Bright yellow blooms of golden ragwort (packera aurea) are visible in the EcoCommons near The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design. Photo by Allison Carter.

Credits

Photos by Kristen Bailey and Brice Zimmerman