The Future (and History) of Wearable Computing

New exhibit features wearable computers of the past and future.

"Meeting the Challenge: The Path Towards a Consumer Wearable Computer," a new exhibit curated by Georgia Tech faculty and researchers, debuted at the 2014 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computer Systems in Toronto at the end of April. The exhibit showcased more than 20 years of research and commercial efforts that helped bring wearable computing technology into people's daily lives.

The project featured more than 50 displays. They included electronic textiles, advances in battery life and on-body interfaces. Several head-mounted displays, including interactive demos with Google's Project Glass, were also featured. School of Interactive Computing Professor Thad Starner, a technical lead on Glass, helped plan the project. Several wearable prototypes that he developed or has used since 1993 were also on display.

Starner worked with School of Industrial Design Asssitant Professor Kevin Shankwiler, School of Industrial Design Research Scientist Clint Zeagler and graduate researcher Yoni Kaplan to plan the exhibit. Discussions are now underway to take it on tour this summer. Click here to see the virtual exhibit.

CHI 2014 is the premier international conference on human-computer interaction.

Professor Thad Starner demonstrates Google Glass. Starner is a technical lead on the Google project.
Professor Thad Starner demonstrates Google Glass. Starner is a technical lead on the Google project.
College of Computing Professor Thad Starner, director of the Contextual Computing Group at Georgia Tech and technical lead/manager on Google's Project Glass.
College of Computing Professor Thad Starner, director of the Contextual Computing Group at Georgia Tech and technical lead/manager on Google's Project Glass.